The bunburys - we're the bunburys


In 1966, Gibb has won the annual Radio 5KA award for the best composition of the year, "I Was a Lover, A Leader of Men". [22] [23] [24]

A minor hit in 1965, " Wine and Women ", led to the group's first LP, The Bee Gees Sing and Play 14 Barry Gibb Songs . By 1966 Festival was, however, on the verge of dropping them from the Leedon roster because of their perceived lack of commercial success. It was at this time that they met the American-born songwriter, producer and entrepreneur Nat Kipner , who had just been appointed A&R manager of a new independent label, Spin Records . Kipner briefly took over as the group's manager and successfully negotiated their transfer to Spin in exchange for granting Festival the Australian distribution rights to the group's recordings. [ citation needed ] Through Kipner the Bee Gees met engineer-producer, Ossie Byrne , who produced (or co-produced with Kipner) many of the earlier Spin recordings, most of which were cut at his own small, self-built St Clair Studio in the Sydney suburb of Hurstville . Byrne gave the Gibb brothers virtually unlimited access to St Clair Studio over a period of several months in mid-1966. [17] The group later acknowledged that this enabled them to greatly improve their skills as recording artists. During this productive time they recorded a large batch of original material—including the song that would become their first major hit, " Spicks and Specks " (on which Byrne played the trumpet coda)—as well as cover versions of current hits by overseas acts such as the Beatles. They regularly collaborated with other local musicians, including members of beat band Steve & The Board, led by Steve Kipner , Nat's teenage son. [18]

The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. They were born British citizens on the Isle of Man to English parents, lived in Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester, England, United Kingdom and during their childhood years moved to Brisbane, Australia, where they began their musical careers. Their worldwide success came when they returned to the United Kingdom and signed with producer Robert Stigwood.

The multiple award-winning group was successful for most of its forty years of recording music, but it had two distinct periods of exceptional success: as a harmonic "soft rock" act in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and as the foremost stars of the disco music era in the late 1970s. The group sang three-part tight harmonies that were instantly recognizable; as brothers, their voices blended perfectly, in the same way that The Everly Brothers and The Beach Boys did. Barry sang lead on many songs, in an R&B falsetto introduced in the disco years; Robin provided the clear vibrato lead that was a hallmark of their pre-disco music; Maurice sang high and low harmonies throughout their career. The three brothers co-wrote most of their hits, and they said that they felt like they became 'one person' when they were writing. The group's name was retired after Maurice died suddenly in January 2003.

The Bee Gees were inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997; fittingly, the presenter of the award to "Britain's first family of harmony" was Brian Wilson, leader of the Beach Boys, America's first family of rock harmony.

One of the things I want to achieve here is to put the brothers’ music in its contemporary context and evaluate how well it succeeds both on a commercial level and as art. Pop music is so often knocked as a form by purists. There is no pure form of pop: pop is the music that blends all others into a great collage of almost unlimited potential. For its eclecticism pop is sometimes overlooked as a valid form in and of itself. Over the years since the Bee Gees started, the music business has shattered into small market segments in which only the pop music of hit songs finds a home. I think there is more to the pop form. I think there is worthwhile pop music on album cuts and B sides. That is where some of the best stuff is, mixtures a little too far out there for the singles market. In appreciating pop music we should ask more than how many units were shipped. We should ask how well it was done. Do the music and words and arrangement and performance and recording work together? I am sure the Gibb brothers have asked themselves that question for each record they have made. Whether you agree with my comments or not I hope they will raise some good points and add to an appreciation of Gibb songs.

Barry Alan Crompton Gibb, CBE (born 1 September 1946) is a British singer, songwriter, musician and record producer who rose to worldwide fame as a …


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